A collection of the most esteemed pieces of poetry: that have appeared for several years. With variety of originals, by the late Moses Mendez, Esq; and other contributors to Dodsley's collection. To which this is intended as a supplement. London: printed for Richardson and Urquhart, 1767. [8],320p. ; 8⁰. (ESTC T124631; DMI 1073; OTA K099398.000)

  • A COLLECTION OF THE Most esteemed PIECES of POETRY, That have appeared for several YEARS.

    WITH VARIETY OF ORIGINALS, By the Late MOSES MENDEZ, Esq And other Contributors to DODSLEY's COLLECTION.

    To which this is intended as a SUPPLEMENT.

    [Illustration]

    LONDON: Printed for Richardson and Urquhart, under the Royal Exchange. MDCCLXVII.

  • ADVERTISEMENT.

    THE Editor's chief intention in making the following Collection was to bring into one point of view the best pieces which have appeared since the conclusion of Dodsley's collection; and he will venture to affirm, that whatever be the merit of that entertaining miscellany, this does not fall short any ways of it, as some of the volumes in that are made up from the publications of a few years; whereas this contains whatever has been most applauded in a course of twenty. But he has not confined himself to that period only, but inserted many pieces, in his opinion, of great merit, which the inattention of the public, or the obscurity of the publication, had long suffered to remain unnoticed. To these are added many originals by writers of acknowledged merit; among which those of Mr. Mendez, author of the Chaplet, and several admired poems in Dodsley's Miscellany, make no mean figure. Mr. Mendez was reckoned among the most agreeable poets of his time, and, perhaps, he was the only one that was ever worth one hundred thousand pounds.

  • CONTENTS.

    • AN Elegy on the Death of a Lady. By W. Mason, M.A. 1
    • Oriental Eclogues. By Mr. William Collins 7
      • Eclogue I. Sclim, or the Shepherd's Moral ibid.
      • Eclogue II. Hassan; or the Camel-driver 12
      • Eclogue III. Abra; or the Georgian Sultana 15
      • Eclogue IV. Agil and Secander; or the Fugitives 18
    • An Ode to Fear. By the same 21
    • The Passions. An Ode to Music. By the same 24
    • Every Man the Architect of his own Fortune. A Satire. By Mr. Scott of Trinity-college Cambridge 29
    • To Pleasure. An Ode. By the same 42
    • Albin and the Daughter of Mey. By the late Mr. Jerom Stone 47
    • Edwin and Angelina. A Ballad. By Dr. Goldsmith 55
    • The Cit's Country-Box, 1757. By Robert Lloyd, M.A. 62
    • The Actor. By the same 67
    • William and Margaret. By David Mallet, Esq 77
    • A Fragment. By the same 81
    • Zephir; or the Stratagem. By the same 84
    • Edwin and Emma. By the same 92
    • A Prayer for Indifference. By Mrs. Greville 96
    • Ode on the Duke of York's second Departure from England. By the Author of the Shipwreck 99
    • To Sickness. An Elegy. By Mr. Delap 107
    • [Page]Verses to the People of England 1758. By W. Whitehead, Esq; Poet-Laureat 110
    • To William Shenstone, Esq; the Production of half an Hour's Leisure 115
    • A Song. Written to a Lady 117
    • To a Lady before Marriage. By the late Mr. Tickel. Not published in his Works 118
    • Prologue upon Prologues. Written by Mr. Garrick 121
    • Mr. Foote's Address to the Public, after a Prosecution against him for a Libel 123
    • Extract from Mr. Whitehead's Charge to the Poets 125
    • The Elm and Vine. A Fable 129
    • Prologue to the Englishman at Bourdeaux 131
    • Epilogue 132
    • An Ode on St. Caecilia's Day. By B. Thornton, Esq; 134
    • Advice to the Marquis of Rockingham. By an old Courtier 139
    • La Liberta. Translated from Metastasio 140
    • Bryan and Pereere. A West-Indian Ballad 144
    • The Passionate Shepherd to his Love. An old Ballad 147
    • My Mind to me a Kingdom is. An old Ballad 148
    • Cupid's Pastime. An old Sonnet 150
    • Winifreda 153
    • Admiral Hosier's Ghost. By Mr. Glover, Author of Leonidas 154
    • The Shepherd's Resolution. An old Ballad. By George Wither 158
    • The Stedfast Shepherd. By the same 159
    • Autumn. By Mr. Brerewood 162
    • The Pin. By Mr. Woty 165
    • A Present to a young Lady with a Pair of Stockings 167
    • A Dialogue between a Poet and his Servant. By the late Mr. Christopher Pitt 170
    • A Parody on the City and Country Mouse 175
    • The Recantation. An Ode 177
    • Verses written on a Pedestal, &c. 180
    • [Page]Song 183
    • The Lady and the Linnet. A Tale 184
    • The Genius of Britain. An Iambic Ode 191
    • Hope. A Pastoral Ballad 195
    • Ode to Sensibility 196
    • Petrarch and Laura. An Epigrammatic Tale 198
    • To Winter. By Mr. Woty 199
    • An Epistle of M. de Voltaire. From the French 202
    • The Winter's Walk. By Samuel Johnston, L.L.D. 208
    • Epitaph on Claudius Phillips. By the same 209
    • The Poor Man's Prayer ibid.
    • An Epitaph, written by Mr. Smith, on his Wife 214
    • Verses to Mr. Dodsley. By Richard Berringer, Esq; 215
    • Mr. Dodsley's Answer 216
    • The Wish 217
    • A Song. By Dr. Delany. His Name, by Mistake is not put down at the Head of the Poem 219
    • On Mr. Walpole's House at Strawberry-Hill. By Miss M. 223
    • To the Authoress of some Lines on Strawberry-Hill. By the Hon. Horace Walpole 225
    • To Apollo making Love. From Mons. Fontenelle. By Thomas Tickell, Esq; 226
    • The Thirteenth Book of Virgil. Written by Maphoeus Vejius. Translated by Moses Mendez, Esq; 227
    • The Author's Account of his Journey to Ireland. By the same 257
    • The Answer. By Mr. Ellis 264
    • To Mr. S. Tucker. By Mr. Mendez 267
    • The Winter-Solstice. By Dr. Akenside 274
    • The Poet and his Patron. By Mr. Moore 278
    • The Wolfe, Sheep, and Lamb 281
    • The Tears of Scotland. Written in 1746 285
    • Caesar's Dream before his Invasion of Britain. By Mr. Langhorne 288
    • The Eagle and Robin Red-Breast. By Mr. Archibald Scott 291
    • [Page]Isis. An Elegy. By Mr. Mason 294
    • The Nun. An Elegy 299
    • The Gift: To Iris. By Dr. Goldsmith 305
    • The Rookery 306
    • A Receipt to make L'Eau de Vie. By the late Mr. Charles King 308
    • Day. A Pastoral. By Mr. Cunningham 310
    • Content. A Pastoral. By the same 316
    • Coryoon. A Pastoral. By the same 317
    • Melody. By the same 319

    {inverted ⁂} Notwithstanding the Care of the Editor, the Song of Winifrida (inserted in Dodsley's Collection) has crept in here; but as it takes up only a single Page, it was thought unnecessary to cancel it.

  • AN ELEGY, On the DEATH of a LADY. Written in 1760. / William Mason
  • ORIENTAL ECLOGUES. / William Collins
  • AN ODE TO FEAR. / William Collins
  • THE PASSIONS, AN ODE FOR MUSIC. / William Collins
  • EVERY MAN THE ARCHITECT of his own FORTUNE: OR THE ART OF RISING IN THE CHURCH. A SATYRE. / James Scott
  • TO PLEASURE. AN ODE. / James Scott
  • ALBIN and the DAUGHTER of MEY. An old tale, translated from the Irish. / Jerome Stone
  • EDWIN AND ANGELINA. A BALLAD. / Oliver Goldsmith
  • THE CIT's COUNTRY-BOX, 1757. / Robert Lloyd
  • THE ACTOR. ADDRESSED TO BONNELL THORNTON, Esq / Robert Lloyd
  • WILLIAM AND MARGARET. / David Mallet
  • A FRAGMENT. / David Mallet
  • ZEPHIR: or, the STRATAGEM. / David Mallet
  • EDWIN AND EMMA. / David Mallet
  • A PRAYER FOR INDIFFERENCE. / Frances Greville (née Macartney)
  • ODE on the Duke of YORK's second De parture from England, as REAR ADMIRAL. / William Falconer
  • To SICKNESS; AN ELEGY. / John Delap
  • VERSES to the People of ENGLAND 1758. / William Whitehead
  • TO WILLIAM SHENSTONE, Esq The PRODUCTION of Half an Hour's Leisure. / Elizabeth Thomas
  • A SONG. WRITTEN TO A LADY. / Anonymous
  • To a LADY before MARRIAGE. / Thomas Tickell
  • PROLOGUE upon PROLOGUES. / David Garrick
  • MR. FOOTE's ADDRESS TO THE PUBLIC, After a Prosecution against him for a LIBEL. / Samuel Foote
  • EXTRACTED FROM MR. W. WHITEHEAD's CHARGE to the POETS. / William Whitehead
  • THE ELM AND VINE. A FABLE. / Anonymous
  • PROLOGUE TO THE ENGLISHMAN AT BOURDEAUX. Performed since the conclusion of the peace, with universal applause, at PARIS. / Anonymous
  • EPILOGUE. / Anonymous
  • AN ODE ON ST. CAECILIA'S DAY, Adapted to the antient British music, viz. the salt-box, the Jew's harp, the marrow-bones and cleavers, the hum-strum or hurdy-gurdy, &c. as it was performed on June 10, 1763, at Ranelagh. / Bonnell Thornton
  • ADVICE to the Marquis of ROCKINGHAM, upon a late Occasion. Written in 1765, by an OLD COURTIER. / David Garrick
  • LIBERTY. LA LIBERTA. Newly translated from METASTASIO. / Anonymous
  • BRYAN AND PEREENE. A WEST INDIAN BALLAD; / James Grainger
  • THE PASSIONATE SHEPHERD TO HIS LOVE.AN OLD BALLAD.

    COME live with me, and be my love,
    And we will all the pleasures prove
    That hills and vallies, dale and field,
    And all the craggy mountains yield.
    There will we sit upon the rocks,
    And see the shepherds feed their flocks,
    By shallow rivers, to whose falls
    Melodious birds sing madrigals.
    There will I make thee beds of roses
    With a thousand fragrant posies,
    A cap of flowers, and a kirtle
    Imbroidered all with leaves of mirtle;
    A gown made of the finest wool,
    Which from our pretty lambs we pull;
    Slippers lin'd choicely for the cold,
    With buckles of the purest gold;
    [Page 148]
    A belt of straw, and ivy buds,
    With coral clasps, and amber studs:
    And if these pleasures may thee move,
    Then live with me, and be my love.
    The shepherd-swains shall dance and sing
    For thy delight each May-morning:
    If these delights thy mind may move,
    Then live with me, and be my love.
  • MY MIND TO ME A KINGDOM IS.AN OLD BALLAD.

    MY minde to me a kingdome is;
    Such perfect joy therein I finde
    As farre exceeds all earthly blisse,
    That God or Nature hath assignde:
    Though much I want, that most would have,
    Yet still my mind forbids to crave.
    Content I live, this is my stay;
    I seek no more than may suffice:
    I presse to beare no haughtie sway;
    Look what I lack my mind supplies.
    Loe! thus I triumph like a king,
    Content with that my mind doth bring.
    [Page 149]
    I see how plentie surfets oft,
    And hastie clymbers soonest fall:
    I see that such as sit aloft
    Mishap doth threaten most of all:
    These get with toile, and keep with feare:
    Such cares my mind could never beare.
    No princely pompe, nor welthie store,
    No force to winne a victorie,
    No wylie wit to salve a sore,
    No shape to winne a lovers eye;
    To none of these I yeeld as thrall,
    For why my mind dispiseth all.
    Some have too much, yet still they crave,
    I little have, yet seek no more:
    They are but poore, tho' much they have;
    And I am rich with litle store:
    They poor, I rich; they beg, I give;
    They lacke, I lend; they pine, I give.
    I laugh not at anothers losse,
    I grudge not at anothers gaine;
    No worldly wave my mind can tosse,
    I brooke that is another's bane:
    I feare no foe, nor fawne on friend;
    I loth not life, nor dread mine end.
    [Page 150]
    My welth is health, and perfect ease;
    My conscience clere my chiefe defence:
    I never seeke by brybes to please,
    Nor by desert to give offence:
    Thus do I live, thus will I die;
    Would all did so as well as I!
  • CUPID's PASTIME.AN OLD SONNET.

    IT chanc'd of late a shepherd swain,
    That went to seek his straying sheep,
    Within a thicket on a plain
    Espied a dainty nymph asleep.
    Her golden hair o'erspread her face;
    Her careless arms abroad were cast;
    Her quiver had her pillows place;
    Her breast lay bare to every blast.
    The snepherd stood and gaz'd his fill;
    Nought durst he do; nought durst he say;
    Whilst chance, or else perhaps his will,
    Did guide the god of love that way.
    [Page 151]
    The crafty boy thus sees her sleep,
    Whom if she wak'd he durst not see;
    Behind her closely seeks to creep,
    Before her nap should ended be.
    There come, he steals her shafts away,
    And puts his own into their place;
    Nor dares he any longer stay,
    But, ere she wakes, hies thence apace.
    Scarce was he gone, but she awakes,
    And spies the shepherd standing by:
    Her bended bow in haste she takes,
    And at the simple swain lets flye.
    Forth flew the shaft, and pierc'd his heart,
    That to the ground he fell with pain:
    Yet up again forthwith he start,
    And to the nymph he ran amain.
    Amazed to see so strange a sight,
    She shot, and shot, but all in vain;
    The more his wounds, the more his might,
    Love yielded strength amidst his pain.
    Her angry eyes were great with tears,
    She blames her hand, she blames her skill;
    The bluntness of her shafts she fears,
    And try them on herself she will.
    [Page 152]
    Take heed, sweet nymph, trye not thy shaft,
    Each little touch will pierce thy heart:
    Alas! thou know'st not Cupid's craft;
    Revenge is joy; the end is smart.
    Yet try she will, and pierce some bare;
    Her hands were glov'd, but next to hand
    Was that fair breast, that breast so rare,
    That made the shepherd senseless stand.
    That breast she pierc'd; and through that breast
    Love found an entry to her heart;
    At seeling of this new-come guest,
    Lord! how this gentle nymph did start.
    She runs not now; she shoots no more;
    Away she throws both shaft and bow:
    She seeks for what she shunn'd before,
    She thinks the shepherd's haste too slow.
    Though mountains meet not, lovers may:
    What other lovers do, did they:
    The god of love sate on a tree,
    And laught that pleasant sight to see.
  • WINIFREDA. / John Gilbert Cooper
  • ADMIRAL HOSIER's GHOST. / Richard Glover
  • THE SHEPHERD'S RESOLUTION.An OLD BALLAD.

    SHALL I, wasting in dispaire,
    Dye because a woman's faire?
    Or make pale my cheeks with care,
    'Cause another's rosie are?
    Be shee fairer than the day,
    Or the flowry meads in May;
    If she think not well of me,
    What care I how faire shee be!
    Shall my heart be griev'd or pin'd,
    'Cause I see a woman kind?
    Or a well-disposed nature
    Joyned with a lovely feature?
    Be shee meeker, kinder, than
    The turtle-dove or pelican;
    If shee be not so to me,
    What care I how kind shee be?
    Shall a woman's virtues move
    Me, to perish for her love?
    Or, her well-deservings knowne,
    Make me quite forget my owne?
    [Page 159]
    Be shee with that goodnesse blest,
    Which may merit name of Best;
    If she be not such to me,
    What care I how good shee be?
    'Cause her fortune seems too high,
    Shall I play the foole and dye?
    Those that beare a noble minde,
    Where they want of riches find,
    Thinke what with them they would doe,
    That without them dare to woe;
    And, unlesse that minde I see,
    What care I, though great shee be?
    Great or good, or kind or faire,
    I will ne'er the more dispaire:
    If she love me, this beleeve,
    I will die ere she shall grieve.
    If she slight me, when I wooe;
    I can scorne and let her goe:
    For, if shee be not for me,
    What care I for whom shee be?
  • THE STEDFAST SHEPHERD.

    HENCE away, you Syrens, leave me,
    And unclaspe your wanton armes;
    Sugred words shall ne'er deceive me,
    (Though 'you' prove a thousand charmes).
    [Page 160]
    Fie, fie, forbeare;
    No common snare
    Could ever my affection chaine:
    Your painted baits
    And poore deceits,
    Are all bestowed on me in vaine.
    I'm no slave to such, as you be;
    Neither shall a snowy brest,
    Wanton eye, or lip of ruby
    Ever robb me of my rest;
    Goe, goe, display
    Your beautie's ray
    To some ore-soone enamour'd swaine:
    Those common wiles
    Of sighs and smiles
    Are all bestowed on me in vaine.
    I have elsewhere vowed a dutie;
    Turn away 'your' tempting eyes:
    Shew not me a naked beautie;
    Those impostures I despise:
    My spirit lothes
    Where gawdy clothes
    And fained othes may love obtaine:
    I love her so,
    Whose looke swears No;
    That all your labours will be vaine.
    [Page 161]
    Can he prize the tainted posies,
    Which on every brest are worne;
    That may plucke the spotlesse roses
    From their never-touched thorne?
    I can goe rest
    On her sweet brest,
    That is the pride of Cynthia's traine:
    Then hold your tongues;
    Your mermaid songs
    Are all bestowed on me in vaine.
    Hee's a foole, that basely dallies,
    Where each peasant mates with him;
    Shall I haunt the thronged vallies,
    Whilst ther's noble hils to climbe?
    No, no, though clowns
    Are skar'd with frownes,
    I know the best can but disdaine;
    And those I'le prove;
    So shall your love
    Be all bestowed on me in vaine.
    I doe scorne to vow a dutie,
    Where each lustfull lad may woe:
    Give me her, whose sun-like beautie
    Buzzards dare not soare unto:
    Shee, shee it is
    Affoords that blisse
    [Page 162]
    For which I would refuse no paine:
    But such as you,
    Fond fooles, adieu;
    You seeke to captive me in vaine.
    Leave me then, you Syrens, leave me;
    Seeke no more to worke my harmes:
    Craftie wiles cannot deceive me,
    Who am proofe against your charmes:
    You labour may
    To lead astray
    The heart, that constant shall remaine:
    And I the while
    Will sit and smile
    To see you spend your time in vaine.
  • AUTUMN. / Thomas Brerewood
  • THE PIN. / William Woty
  • A PRESENT TO A YOUNG LADY WITH A PAIR OF STOCKINGS. / Anonymous
  • A DIALOGUE BETWEEN A POET AND HIS SERVANT. / Christopher Pitt
  • PARODY ON THE CITY AND COUNTRY MOUSE. / Francis Fawkes
  • THE RECANTATION. AN ODE. / Samuel Whyte
  • VERSE. WRITTEN UPON A PEDESTAL BENEATH A ROW OF ELMS IN A MEADOW NEAR RICHMOND FERRY, BELONGING TO RICHARD OWEN CAMBRIDGE, ESQ. SEPT. MDCCLX. / Samuel Whyte
  • SONG. / William Woty
  • THE LADY AND THE LINNET. A TALE. / Anonymous
  • THE GENIUS OF BRITAIN. AN IAMBIC ODE. / John Gilbert Cooper
  • HOPE. A PASTORAL BALLAD. / Anonymous
  • ODE TO SENSIBILITY. / Anonymous
  • PETRARCH AND LAURA. AN EPIGRAMMATIC TALE. / Anonymous
  • TO WINTER. / William Woty
  • AN EPISTLE OF M. DE VOLTAIRE UPON HIS ARRIVAL AT HIS ESTATE NEAR THE LAKE OF GENEVA, IN MARCH, MDCCLV. / François Marie Arouet de Voltaire; Anonymous (translator)
  • THE WINTER's WALK. / Samuel Johnson
  • EPITAPH ON CLAUDIUS PHILLIPS. / Samuel Johnson
  • THE POOR MAN's PRAYER. ADDRESSED TO LORD CHATHAM. / William Hayward Roberts
  • AN EPITAPH, / Caleb Smith
  • VERSE. / Richard Berenger
  • MR. DODSLEY's ANSWER. / Robert Dodsley
  • THE WISH. / Anonymous
  • A SONG. / Patrick Delany
  • ON MR. WALPOLE's HOUSE AT STRAWBERRY HILL. / Jael Henrietta Pye (née Mendez)
  • To the AUTHORESS of some Lines on STRAWBERRY-HILL. / Horace Walpole
  • TO APOLLO MAKING LOVE. FROM MONSIEUR FONTENELLE. / Thomas Tickell
  • THE THIRTEENTH BOOK OF VIRGIL. / Moses Mendez
  • THE AUTHOR'S ACCOUNT of his JOURNEY to IRELAND. To Mr. JOHN ELLIS. / Moses Mendez
  • The ANSWER. / John Ellis
  • TO MR. S. TUCKER. / Moses Mendez
  • ON THE WINTER SOLSTICE. M. D.CC.XL. / Mark Akenside
  • THE POET AND HIS PATRON. / Edward Moore
  • THE WOLF, SHEEP, AND LAMB. / Edward Moore
  • THE TEARS OF SCOTLAND. WRITTEN IN THE YEAR MDCCXLVI. / Tobias Smollett
  • CAESAR's DREAM, Before his Invasion of BRITAIN. / John Langhorne
  • THE EAGLE and ROBIN RED-BREAST. A FABLE. / Allan Ramsay
  • ISIS. An ELEGY. WRITTEN BY MR. MASON OF CAMBRIDGE, 1748. / William Mason
  • THE NUN. AN ELEGY. / Edward Jerningham
  • THE GIFT: TO IRIS. / Oliver Goldsmith
  • THE ROOKERY. / Anonymous
  • A RECEIPT how to make L'EAU DE VIE. WRITTEN AT THE DESIRE OF A LADY. / Charles King
  • DAY: A PASTORAL. / John Cunningham
  • CONTENT: A PASTORAL. / John Cunningham
  • CORYDON: A PASTORAL. / John Cunningham
  • MELODY. / John Cunningham