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SCOTCH BALLAD.

1 AH, EVAN, by thy winding stream
2 How once I lov'd to stray,
3 And view the morning's redd'ning beam,
4 Or charm of closing day!
5 To yon dear grot by EVAN'S side,
6 How oft my steps were led;
7 Where far beneath the waters glide,
8 And thick the woods are spread!
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9 But I no more a charm can see
10 In EVAN'S lovely glades;
11 And drear and desolate to me
12 Are those enchanting shades.
13 While far how far from EVAN'S bowers,
14 My wand'ring lover flies;
15 Where dark the angry tempest lowers,
16 And high the billows rise!
17 And O, where'er the wand'rer goes,
18 Is that poor mourner dear,
19 Who gives, while soft the EVAN flows,
20 Each passing wave a tear?
21 And does he now that grotto view?
22 On those steep banks still gaze?
23 In fancy does he still pursue
24 The EVAN'S lovely maze?
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25 O come! repass the stormy wave,
26 O toil for gold no more!
27 Our love a dearer pleasure gave
28 On EVAN'S peaceful shore.
29 Leave not my breaking heart to mourn
30 The joys so long denied;
31 Ah, soon to those green banks return,
32 Where EVAN meets the CLYDE.

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About this text

Title (in Source Edition): SCOTCH BALLAD.
Themes: nature
Genres: ballad metre

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Source edition

Poems on various subjects: with introductory remarks on the present state of science and literature in France. London: G. and W. B. Whittaker, 1823, pp. [156]-158. 

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The text has been typographically modernized, but without any silent modernization of spelling, capitalization, or punctuation. The source of the text is given and all editorial interventions have been recorded in textual notes. Based on the electronic text originally produced by the ECCO-TCP project, this ECPA text has been edited to conform to the recommendations found in Level 5 of the Best Practices for TEI in Libraries version 3.0.

Other works by Helen Maria Williams