Horæ lyricæ: Poems, chiefly of the lyric kind. In two books. ... By I. Watts. London: Printed by S. and D. Bridge, for John Lawrence at the Sign of the Angel in the Poultrey. MDCCVI., 1706. [20],267,[1]p.; 8⁰. (ESTC T82397; OTA K067329.000)

  • HORAE LYRICAE. POEMS, Chiefly of the Lyric kind. In Two Books. I. SONGS, &c. Sacred to DEVOTION. II. ODES, ELEGYS, &c. to VERTUE Loyalty and Friendship.

    By I. WATTS.

    — Si non Uranie lyram
    Coelestem cohibet, nec Polyhymnia
    Humanum resugit tendere barbiton.
    Horat. Od. 1. Imitat.
    〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉Pythag. Aur. Carm.

    LONDON, Printed by S. and D. Bridge, for John Lawrence at the Sign of the Angel in the Poultrey. MDCCVI.

  • PREFACE.

    IT has been a long Complaint of the Vertuous and Refined World, that Poesie whose Original is Divine, should be enslav'd to Vice and Profaneness; that an Art inspired from Heaven should have so far lost the Memory of its Birth-place, as to be ingaged in the Interests of Hell: and bring all her resistless Forces of Metaphor, Wit, Rhyme and Number, and range them under the Banner of the Great Malicious Spirit to assault the Honour of God and the Souls of Men.

    The Eldest Song which History has brought down to our Ears was a noble Act of Worship paid to the God of Israel,When his Right hand became glorious in Power, when thy Right hand, O Lord, dashed in pieces the Enemy; the Chariots of Pharaoh and his Host were cast into the Red-Sea; Thou didst blow with thy Wind, the Deep covered them, and they sank as Lead in the mighty Waters, Exod. 15.This Art was maintain'd Sacred thro' the following Ages of the Church, and imploy'd by Kings and Prophets, by David, Solomon, and Isaiah, in breathing the Life of Angels into the Hearts of Men, and rearing their Minds Heavenward in warm and tuneful Devotion.

    [Page]

    In the Younger Days of Heathenism the Muses were devoted to the same Service: The Language in which Old Hesiod addresses them is this.

    〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉,
    In English.
    Pierian Muses, fam'd for Heavenly Lays,
    Descend, and sing the God your Fathers Praise.

    And the pursues the Subject in ten Pious Lines, which I could not forbear to Transcribe if the Aspect and Sound of so much Greek were not terrifying to a nice Reader.

    But some of the later Poets of the Pagan World have more debased this Divine Gift, and many of the Writers of first Rank in this our Age of National Christians have to their Eternal Shame surpassed the vilest of the Gentiles. They have Expos'd Religion to Drollery, and drest her up in the most Ridiculous Habit, for the Scorn of the ruder Herd of Mankind. They have painted the Vices like so many Goddesses, added the Charms of Wit to Debauchery, and heightned the Temptation where Nature needs the strongest Restraints. With Sweetness of Sound and Delicacy of Expression they have given a Relish to Blasphemies of the harshest kind, and when they rant at their Maker in Sonorous Numbers they fancy themselves to have acted the Hero well.

    [Page]

    Thus almost in vain have the Throne and the Pulpit cried, Reformation, while the Stage and Licentious Poems have waged open War with the Pious Design of Church and State. The Press has spread the Poyson far, and scatter'd wide the Mortal Infection; Unthinking Youth have been allured to Sin beyond the Vicious Propensities of Nature, plung'd early into Diseases and Death, and sunk down to Damnation in Multitudes. How will these Allies of the Nether World, the Lewd and Profane Versifiers stand aghast before the Great Judge, when the Blood of many Souls whom they never saw shall be laid to the Charge of their Writings, and be dreadfully requir'd at their Hands. The Reverend Mr. Collier has set this Awful Scene before them in just and flaming Colours; and if the Application were not too rude and uncivil, that noble Stanza of my Lord Roscommon on Psal. 148. might be address'd to them,

    Ye Dragons, whose Contagious Breath
    Peoples the dark Retreats of Death,
    Change your dire Hissings into Heav'nly Songs,
    And praise your Maker with your Forked Tongues.

    But alass! there is a deep Silence among these Men of all Divine Subjects, unless in Banter; The Wonders of Creating Power, the Mysteries of Redeeming Love, and the mighty Works of Renewing Grace are neglected by those, whom Heaven has indued with a Gift proper to adorn and cultivate 'em: An Art whose sweet Insinuations might have almost[Page] convey'd Piety into resisting Nature, and melted Souls of Iron to the Love of Virtue.

    Will the Writers of this Age cite the French Critic on their side, and say,

    De la Foy d'un Chrétien les Mysteres terribles
    D'Ornemens egayez ne sont point susceptibles:

    That the Mysteries of Christianity are not capable of〈◊〉Ornaments: The Davideis and the two Arthurs〈◊〉broke down this Obstacle, and experimentally•••futed the vain pretence.

    Besides, the Christian Mysteries have no need of these Tinsel Trappings; the Glories of our Religion in a plain Narration and a simple Dress have something brighter and bolder in them, something more surprizing and Divine, than all the Adventures of Gods and Heroes, all the dazling Images of false lustre that compose and garnish a Heathen Poem; here the Subjects themselves would give wonderful Aids to the Muse; and the Heavenly Theme would so relieve a dull Hour and a languishing Genius, that when the Muse nods, the Sense would burn and sparkle upon the Reader, and keep him feelingly awake.

    With how much less toil and expence might a Dryden, an Otway, a Congreve, or a Dennis furnish out a Christian Poem than a Modern Play; there is nothing amongst all the Ancient Fables or Later Romances, that have two such Extremes united in them, as the Eternal God becoming an Infant of Days, the Possessor of the Pallace of Heaven laid to[Page] Sleep in a Manger, the Holy Jesus who knew no Sin bearing the Sins of Men in his Body on the Tree, Agonies of Sorrow loading the Soul of him who was God over all Blessed for ever; and the Soveraign of Life stretching his Arms on a Cross, Bleeding and Expiring: The Heaven and the Hell in our Divinity are infinitely more delightful and dreadful than the Childish Figments of a Dog with three Heads, the Buckets of the Belides, the Furies with Snaky Hairs, or all the Flow'ry Stories of Elysium. Aud if we survey the one as Themes Divinely True, and the other as a Medly of Fooleries which we can never believe, the advantage for touching the Springs of Passion will fall infinitely on the side of the Christian Poet; our Wonder and our Love, our Pity, Delight, and Sorrow, with the long train of Hopes and Fears, must needs be under the Command of an Harmonious Pen, whose every Line makes a part of the Reader's Faith, and is the very Life or Death of his Soul.

    If the trifling and incredible Tales that furnish out a Tragedy are so arm'd by Wit and Fancy as to become Soveraign of the Rational Powers, to triumph over all the Affections, and manage our Smiles and our Tears at pleasure; how wondrous a Conquest might be obtain'd over a wild World, and reduce it at least to Sobriety, if the same Happy Talent were employed in dressing the Scenes of Religion in their proper Figures of Majesty, Beauty and Terror. The Affairs of this Life with their reference to a Life to come, would shine bright in a Dramatick Description. The Anguish of inward Guilt, the secret Stings[Page] and Racks and Scourges of Conscience, the sweet retiring Hours and Seraphical Joys of Devotion, the Victory of a Resolved Soul over a thousand Temptations, the Inimitable Love and Passion of a Dying God, the Awful Glories of the last Tribunal, the grand Decisive Sentence from which there is no Appeal, and the Consequent Transports or Horrors of the two Eternal Worlds. How would such a Performance call back the dying Piety of the Nation to Life and Beauty: It would make Religion appear like it self, and confound the Blasphemies of a profligate World, ignorant of Pious Pleasures.

    But we have reason to fear that the Tuneful Men of our Day have not rais'd their Ambition to so Divine a Pitch; I should rejoyce to see more of this Coelestial Fire kindling within them, for the Flashes that break out in some present and past Writings betray an Infernal Source. This the Incomparable Mr. Cowley in the latter End of his Preface, and the Ingenious Sir Richard Blackmore in the beginning of his have so pathetically describ'd and lamented; and I rather refer the Reader to mourn with them than detain and tire him here. These Gentlemen in their large and laboured Works of Poesie have given the World happy Examples of what they wish and incourage in Prose: The One in a rich Variety of Thought and Fancy; the Other in all the Beauties of Profuse and Florid Diction.

    If shorter Sonnets were compos'd on sublime Subjects, such as the Psalms of David, and the Holy Transports interspers'd in the other Sacred Writings, or such as the Moral Odes of Horace, and the Ancient[Page] Lyricks, I perswade my self that the Christian Preacher would find abundant Aid from the Poet in his Design to diffuse Vertue and allure Souls to God. If the Heart were first inflam'd from Heaven, and the Muse were not left alone to form the Devotion and pursue a Cold Scent, but only call'd in as an Assistant to the Worship, then the Song would end where the Inspiration ceases; the whole Composure would be of a Piece, all Meridian Light and Meridian Fervor. And the same Pious Flame would be propagated and kept glowing in the Heart of him that reads. Some of the shorter Odes of the two Poets now mentioned, and a few of the Reverend Mr. Norris's Essays in Verse are convincing Instances of the Success of this Proposal.

    'Tis my Opinion also that the free and unconfin'd Measures of Pindar would best maintain the Dignity of the Theme, as well as give a loose to the Devout Soul, nor check the Raptures of her Faith and Love. Tho' in my feeble Attempts of this kind I have most unhappily fetter'd my Thoughts in the narrow Numbers of our Old Psalm-Translators, I have contracted and cramp't the Sense, or render'd it obscure and feeble by the too speedy and regular returns of Rhime.

    If my Friends expect a particular account of this or any other Circumstance relating to what I here Publish, they will be pleas'd to accept of this short one.

    [Page]
    The TITLE
    Assures them that Poesy is not the Business of my Life, and if I seized those Hours of Leisure wherein my Soul was in a more sprightly and tuneful Frame to entertain them or my self with a Divine or Moral Song, I hope I shall find an Easy Pardon.
    The SONGS Sacred to DEVOTION
    Were never written with a design to appear before the Judges of Wit, but only to assist the Meditations and Worship of Vulgar Christians, to whom the Measures of Hopkins by Custom are grown Familiar and Natural, and esteemed almost Sacred by being bound up in the same Volume with Scripture. These are but a small part of two hundred Hymns of the same kind which are ready for Public Use if the World receive favourably what I now present. The Reason that sent these out first, and divided them from their Fellows, is, that in most of These there are some Expressions which are not suited to the plainest Capacities, and differ too much from the usual[Page] Methods of Speech in which Holy Things are propos'd to the general Part of Mankind.
    The ODES to VERTUE &c.
    Were form'd when the Frame and Humour of my Soul was just suited to the Subject of my Verse: The Image of my Heart is painted in them; and if they meet with a Reader whose Soul is akin to mine, perhaps they may agreeably entertain him. The Dullness of the Fancy and Coarseness of Expression will disappear, the sameness of the Humour will create a Pleasure, and insensibly overcome and conceal the Defects of the Muse.
    The IMITATIONS
    Of that Noblest Latin Poet of Modern Ages Casimire Sarbiewski of Poland would need no Excuse, did they but arise to the Beauty of the Original. I have often taken the Freedom to add ten or twenty Lines, or to leave out as many, that I might suit my Song more to my own Design, or because I found it Impossible to present the Force, the Fineness, and[Page] the Fire of his Expression in our Language. I wish some English Pen would import some of the Treasures of that rich Genius and bless our Nation.
    The INSCRIPTIONS
    To particular Friends are warranted and defended by the Practise of the two best Lyric Writers Horace and Casimire: And tho' the Authority of the first be more Venerable, yet if in some Instances I prefer the latter, I pray the Criticks to forgive me; and I hope my Friends will excuse the Freedom of the Address.
    In the POEMS of HEROIC Measure
    I have attempted in Rhime the same variety of Cadence, Comma, and Period, which Blank Verse Glories in as its peculiar Elegance and Ornament.
    In the PINDARIQUES
    I have generally conformed my Lines to the shorter Size of the Ancients, and avoided to imitate the Excessive Lengths to which some Modern Writers have stretched their Sentences, and especially the concluding Verse. In these the Ear is the truest Judge, nor was it made to be enslav'd to any precise Model of Elder or Later Times.

    After all, I must petition my Reader to lay aside the sowr and sullen Air of Criticism, and to assume the Friend. Let him come with a design to be entertain'd and pleas'd, rather than to seek his own Disgust and Aversion, which will not be hard to find. I am not so Vain as to think there are no Faults, nor so Blind as to espy none: There is not one Copy that intirely pleases me: The best of them sinks vastly below the Idea which I form of a Divine or Moral Ode. He that deals in the Mysteries of Heaven, or of the Muses should be a Genius of no Vulgar Mould; and as the Name of Vates belongs to both, so the Furniture of Both is compriz'd in that Line of Horace,

    — Cui Mens Divinior, atque Os
    Magna Locuturum —

    [Page]But what Juvenal spake in his Age abides true in ours: A compleat Poet or a Prophet is such an one— Qualem nequeo monstrare, & sentio tantùm.

    Perhaps neither of these Characters in Perfection shall ever be seen on Earth, till the Seventh Angel has sounded his Awful Trumpet, till the Victory be compleat over the Beast and his Image; when the Natives of Heaven shall joyn in Triumphal Consort with Prophets and Tuneful Saints, and Sing unto their Golden Harps, Salvation Honour and Glory to him that sits upon the Throne, and to the Lamb for ever.

  • [Page]

    A TABLE OF THE Songs, &c. in the First Book.

    • THE Divine Sovereignty Pag. 1
    • The Transcendent Glories of the Deity 4
    • God appears most Glorious in our Salvation by Christ 7
    • An Hymn of Praise to the God of England for Three Great Salvations, (viz.) from the Spanish Invasion, from the Gunpowder Plot, and from Popery and Slavery by King William, in Two Parts 10
    • God Incomprehensible 16
    • Sickness gives a Sight of Heaven 18
    • The Universal Hallelujah: Or Psalm 148 Paraphras'd 21
    • The Love of Christ on his Cross and on his Throne 25
    • Death a Welcome Messenger 27
    • Sincere Praise 29
    • God's Infinity 32
    • [Page]Longing for the second coming of Christ 34
    • The Sufferings and Glories of Christ. A Song in Trissyllable Feet 37
    • The Day of Judgment, an Ode, in English Sapphic 40
    • Confession and Pardon 43
    • Jesus the only Saviour 48
    • A Song of Praise to God, the 100th Psalm. In Trissyllable Feet 52
    An Essay on a few Psalms in Language more suited to the Gospel.
    • The Happy Saint and Cursed Sinner, Psalm 1. 54
    • Doubts and Fears supprest, Psalm 3d. 56
    • Praise to the Lord from all Nations, Psalm 100. 59
    • Brotherly Love, Psalm 133. 61
    • The Pleasure of Love to Christ present or absent 62
    • A Sight of Christ 65
    • Longing for Heaven, or the Song of Angels above 70
    • God Sovereign and Gracious 76
    An Essay on Divine Love in several following Odes, in imitation of Solomon's Song.
    • The Hazard of Loving the Creatures 78
    • Christ's Amazing Love and my Amazing Coldness 80
    • Wishing him ever with me 82
    • [Page]The Absence of the Beloved 84
    • Sick of Love. Solomon's Song 1. 3. 86
    • Sitting in an Arbour 88
    • Bewailing my own Inconstancy 90
    • Forsaken, yet hoping 93
    • The Law and Gospel 95
    • The Death of Moses: Deut. 32. 49, 50. and 34. 5, 6. or, the Injoyment of God worth dying for 97
    • Ad Dominum nostrum & Servatorem Jesum Christum. Oda 100
    • Excitatio Cordis Coelum versus. Ad Seipsum 106
    • Breathing toward the Heavenly Country 108
    • The Glories of God exceed all Worship 110
    [Page]

    A TABLE OF THE Odes, Elegys, &c. in the Second Book.

    • TO Her Majesty Pag. 113
    • To Mr. John Lock, retir'd from Business 117
    • To Mr. John Shute, on Mr. Lock's last Sickness 119
    • To Mr. William Nokes. Friendship. (See more p. 237) 121
    • To Nathanael Gould Esq Lawful Ambition 123
    • To Dr. Thomas Gibson. The Life of Souls 125
    • To my Brothers E. and T. W. False Greatness 128
    • To Mr. A. S. and Mr. T. H. Strict Religion exceeding rare 130
    • On the sudden Death of Mrs. Mary Peacock 133
    • To the Reverend Mr. B. Rowe. 'Tis dangerous to follow the Multitude 136
    • To my Sisters S. and M. W. an Epistle 138
    • [Page]To Mr. C. and S. Fleetwood. The World vain, and the Soul Immortal 141
    • To Mr. William Blackbourn. Life flies too fast to be wasted 144
    • To Mr. Robert Atwood. The Kingdom of the Wise Man. Part 1. 145
    • Part. 2. Or the Bold Stoic 150
    • To the Reverend Mr. Thomas Rowe. Free Philosophy 153
    • To the Reverend Mr. John Howe. The Vanity of Humane Cares 155
    • To Mr. Nicholas Clark. Complaining of Vapours or Disorders of the Head 158
    • Upon the dismal Narrative of the Afflictions of a Friend 161
    • The Reverse, on the view of Remaining Comforts 164
    • To the Right Honourable John Lord Cutts. The Hardy Soldier 167
    • To Mrs. B. Bendish. Against Tears 169
    • A Word of Warning, or Few Happy Marriages 171
    • To Mr. Henry Bendish. The Indian Philosopher, or Matches made above, but broke in coming down 175
    • To David Polhill Esq An Epistle 180
    • To David Polhill Esq An Answer to an Infamous Satyr against King William III. 182
    • To the Discontented and Unquiet. Vertue alone makes the Mind Easy 189
    • To John Hartopp Esq Youth and Pleasure tarry not 194
    • To Thomas Gunston Esq Happy Solitude 197
    • [Page]To John Hartopp Esq The Disdain of Sensual Joys 201
    • Fratri suo Dilecto R. W. Epistola 203
    • To Dr. John Speed of Southampton. An Epistle 207
    • Ad Reverendum Virum Dom. Johannem Pinhorne fidum pueritiae meae Praeceptorem. Oda. 209
    • Votum. Seu Vita in terris Beata. Ad Virum dignissimum Johannem Hartoppium Baronettum 215
    • To the Lady Abney. A Funeral Poem on Tho. Gunston Esq, 219
    • To Mr. Arthur Shallett Merchant: An Elegiac Ode on the Reverend Mr. Thomas Gouge 247
    • An Epitaph on King William III. of Glorious Memory 264
  • ERRATA.

    PAg. 41. lin. 13. read upon. P. 42. l. 10. for arise r. ascend. P. 103. l. 4. after fructus dele [,] P. 126. l. 19. r. beat. P. 134. l. penult r. Sphere. P. 159. l. 2. for How r. Now. P. 190. l. 5. r. Breast. P. 197. l. 3. for They r. The. P. 204. l. 8. r. Patris. P. 214. l. 8. r. Numen, &.

  • BOOK I.Songs and Hymns Sacred to DEVOTION.

    [Page 7][Page 10][Page 16][Page 18][Page 21][Page 25][Page 27][Page 32][Page 34][Page 40][Page 43][Page 48][Page 52][Page 54]

    An Essay on a few of DAVID's PSALMS Translated into Plain Verse, in Language more agreeable to the clearer Revelations of the Gospel.

    [Page 59][Page 61][Page 65][Page 70][Page 76]
    [Page 78]

    [An Essay on Divine Love in several following Odes, in imitation of Solomon's Song.]

    [Page 80][Page 82][Page 97][Page 100]

    AD Dominum nostrum & Servatorem Jesum Christum. ODA.

    I.
    TE, Grande Numen, Corporis Incola,
    Te, magna magni Progenies Patris,
    Nomen verendum nostri Jesû
    Vox, Citharae, Calami sonabunt.
    II.
    Aptentur auro grandisonae Fides,
    Christi Triumphos incipe Barbite,
    Fractosque terrores Averni,
    Victum Erebum, domitamque Mortem.
    [Page 101]
    III.
    Immensa vastos saecula circulos
    Volvêre, blando dum Patris in sinû
    Toto fruebatur Jehovâ
    Gaudia mille bibens Jesus;
    IV.
    Donec superno vidit ab Aethere
    Adam cadentem, Tartara hiantia,
    Unâque mergendos ruinâ
    Heu nimium miseros Nepotes.
    V.
    Vidit minaces Vindicis Angeli
    Ignes & Ensem, Telaque Sanguine
    Tingenda nostro, dum rapinae
    Spe fremuere Erebaea Monstra.
    VI.
    Commota Sacras Viscera protinus
    Sensêre flammas, Omnipotens Furor
    Ebullit, Immensique Amoris
    Aethereum calet Igne pectus.
    [Page 102]
    VII.
    "Non tota prorsus Gens hominum dabit
    " Hosti triumphos: Quid Patris & Labor
    "Dulcisque Imago? Num peribunt
    " Funditus? O prius Astra caecis
    VIII.
    "Mergantur undis, & redeat Chaos.
    " Aut ipse disperdam Satanae dolos,
    "Aut ipse disperdar, & isti
    " Sceptra dabo moderanda dextrae.
    IX.
    "Testor paternum Numen, & hoc Caput
    " Aequale testor, dixit, & Aetheris
    Inclinat ingens culmen, alto
    Desiliitque ruens Olympo.
    X.
    Mortale corpus impiger induit
    Artusque nostros, heu tenues nimis
    Nimisque viles! Vindicique
    Corda dedit fodienda Ferro,
    [Page 103]
    XI.
    Vitamque Morti; Proh dolor! O graves
    Tonantis Irae! O Lex nimis aspera!
    Mercesque peccati severa
    Adamici, vetitique fructus
    XII.
    Non poena lenis! Quô ruis impotens!
    Quo Musa! largas fundere lachrymas,
    Bustique Divini triumphos
    Sacrilego temerare fletu?
    XIII.
    Sepone questus. Laeta Deum cane
    Majore Chordâ. Psalle sonoriùs
    Ut ferreas Mortis cavernas
    Et rigidam penetravit Aulam.
    XIV.
    Sensêre Numen Regna feralia,
    Mugit Barathrum, contremuit Chaos,
    Dirùm fremebat Rex Gehennae,
    Perque suum tremebundus Orcum
    [Page 104]
    XV.
    Latè refugit. "Nil agis Impie,
    " Mergat vel Imis te Phlegethon vadis,
    "Hoc findet undas fulmen, Inquit,
    Et patrios Jaculatus Ignes
    XVI.
    Trajecit hostem. Nigra Silentia
    Umbraeque flammas Aethereas pavent
    Dudum perosae, ex quo corusco
    Praecipites cecidere Coelo.
    XVII.
    Immane rugit jam Tonitru; fragor
    Latè ruinam mandat: ab infimis
    Lectaeque destinata genti
    Tartara disjiciuntur antris.
    XVIII.
    Heìc strata passim vincula, & heìc jacent
    Unci cruenti, Tormina Mentium
    Invisa, ploratuque vasto
    Spicula Mors sibi adempta plangit.
    [Page 105]
    XIX.
    En, ut resurgit Victor ab ultimo
    Ditis Profundo, curribus aureis
    Astricta raptans Monstra Noctis
    Perdomitumque Erebi Tyrannum.
    XX.
    Quanta Angelorum gaudia Jubilant
    Victor paternum dum repetit Polum?
    En qualis ardet, dum beati
    Limina scandit Ovans Olympi!
    XXI.
    Io Triumphe plectra Seraphica,
    Io Triumphe grex hominum sonet,
    Dum laeta quaquaversus ambos
    Astra repercutiunt Triumphos.
    [Page 106]

    Excitatio cordis Coelum versus.

    Ad seipsum.
    I.
    HEU quot sêcla teris carcere Corporis
    Wattsi, quid refugis Limen & Exitum?
    Nec meus Aethereum Culmen, & Atria
    Magni Patris anhelitat?
    II.
    Corpus vile creat mille Molestias,
    Circum Corda volant & Dolor, & Metus,
    Peccatumque malis durius omnibus
    Caecas Insidias struit.
    [Page 107]
    III.
    Non hoc grata tibi Gaudia de solo
    Surgunt. Christus abest, deliciae tuae,
    Longè Christus abest, Inter & Angelos
    Et picta astra perambulans.
    IV.
    * Vide Horat. Lib. 1. Od. 3.
    Coeli summa petas, nec Jaculabitur
    Iracunda Tonans fulmina: Te Deus
    Hortatur; Vacuum tende per Aëra
    Pennas nunc homini datas.
    [Page 108][Page 110]
    The END of the First BOOK.
    Tibi silet Laus, O Deus.Psal. lxv. 1.
  • THE Divine Sovereignty.
  • THE Transcendent Glories OF THE DEITY.
  • GOD Appears most Glorious IN OUR Salvation by CHRIST.
  • AN Hymn of Praise TO The God of ENGLAND, FOR Three Great Salvations. (VIZ.)
  • GOD Incomprehensible.
  • SICKNESS GIVES A Sight of HEAVEN.
  • THE Universal Hallelujah, OR, PSALM 148. PARAPHRAS'D.
  • THE Love of CHRIST ON His CROSS AND On His THRONE.
  • DEATH A Welcome Messenger.
  • Sincere Praise.
  • GOD's Infinity.
  • LONGING FOR The Second Coming OF CHRIST.
  • THE Sufferings and Glories OF CHRIST. A SONG In Trisyllable Feet.
  • THE Day of Judgment. An ODE, Attempted in English Sapphick.
  • Confession and Pardon.
  • JESUS THE Only SAVIOUR.
  • A Song of Praise TO GOD. PSALM C. In Trissyllable Feet.
  • An Essay on a few of DAVID's PSALMS Translated into Plain Verse, in Language more agreeable to the clearer Revelations of the Gospel.

    [Page 59][Page 61][Page 65][Page 70][Page 76]
  • THE HAPPY SAINT AND Cursed Sinner. PSALM I.
  • Doubts and Fears SUPPRES'D. PSALM III.
  • Praise to the LORD FROM All NATIONS. PSALM C.
  • Brotherly Love. PSALM CXXXIII.
  • THE PLEASURE OF Love to CHRIST Present or Absent.
  • A Sight of CHRIST.
  • LONGING FOR HEAVEN, OR, THE Song of Angels Above.
  • GOD Sovereign and Gracious.
  • [Page 78]

    [An Essay on Divine Love in several following Odes, in imitation of Solomon's Song.]

    [Page 80][Page 82][Page 97][Page 100]

    AD Dominum nostrum & Servatorem Jesum Christum. ODA.

    I.
    TE, Grande Numen, Corporis Incola,
    Te, magna magni Progenies Patris,
    Nomen verendum nostri Jesû
    Vox, Citharae, Calami sonabunt.
    II.
    Aptentur auro grandisonae Fides,
    Christi Triumphos incipe Barbite,
    Fractosque terrores Averni,
    Victum Erebum, domitamque Mortem.
    [Page 101]
    III.
    Immensa vastos saecula circulos
    Volvêre, blando dum Patris in sinû
    Toto fruebatur Jehovâ
    Gaudia mille bibens Jesus;
    IV.
    Donec superno vidit ab Aethere
    Adam cadentem, Tartara hiantia,
    Unâque mergendos ruinâ
    Heu nimium miseros Nepotes.
    V.
    Vidit minaces Vindicis Angeli
    Ignes & Ensem, Telaque Sanguine
    Tingenda nostro, dum rapinae
    Spe fremuere Erebaea Monstra.
    VI.
    Commota Sacras Viscera protinus
    Sensêre flammas, Omnipotens Furor
    Ebullit, Immensique Amoris
    Aethereum calet Igne pectus.
    [Page 102]
    VII.
    "Non tota prorsus Gens hominum dabit
    " Hosti triumphos: Quid Patris & Labor
    "Dulcisque Imago? Num peribunt
    " Funditus? O prius Astra caecis
    VIII.
    "Mergantur undis, & redeat Chaos.
    " Aut ipse disperdam Satanae dolos,
    "Aut ipse disperdar, & isti
    " Sceptra dabo moderanda dextrae.
    IX.
    "Testor paternum Numen, & hoc Caput
    " Aequale testor, dixit, & Aetheris
    Inclinat ingens culmen, alto
    Desiliitque ruens Olympo.
    X.
    Mortale corpus impiger induit
    Artusque nostros, heu tenues nimis
    Nimisque viles! Vindicique
    Corda dedit fodienda Ferro,
    [Page 103]
    XI.
    Vitamque Morti; Proh dolor! O graves
    Tonantis Irae! O Lex nimis aspera!
    Mercesque peccati severa
    Adamici, vetitique fructus
    XII.
    Non poena lenis! Quô ruis impotens!
    Quo Musa! largas fundere lachrymas,
    Bustique Divini triumphos
    Sacrilego temerare fletu?
    XIII.
    Sepone questus. Laeta Deum cane
    Majore Chordâ. Psalle sonoriùs
    Ut ferreas Mortis cavernas
    Et rigidam penetravit Aulam.
    XIV.
    Sensêre Numen Regna feralia,
    Mugit Barathrum, contremuit Chaos,
    Dirùm fremebat Rex Gehennae,
    Perque suum tremebundus Orcum
    [Page 104]
    XV.
    Latè refugit. "Nil agis Impie,
    " Mergat vel Imis te Phlegethon vadis,
    "Hoc findet undas fulmen, Inquit,
    Et patrios Jaculatus Ignes
    XVI.
    Trajecit hostem. Nigra Silentia
    Umbraeque flammas Aethereas pavent
    Dudum perosae, ex quo corusco
    Praecipites cecidere Coelo.
    XVII.
    Immane rugit jam Tonitru; fragor
    Latè ruinam mandat: ab infimis
    Lectaeque destinata genti
    Tartara disjiciuntur antris.
    XVIII.
    Heìc strata passim vincula, & heìc jacent
    Unci cruenti, Tormina Mentium
    Invisa, ploratuque vasto
    Spicula Mors sibi adempta plangit.
    [Page 105]
    XIX.
    En, ut resurgit Victor ab ultimo
    Ditis Profundo, curribus aureis
    Astricta raptans Monstra Noctis
    Perdomitumque Erebi Tyrannum.
    XX.
    Quanta Angelorum gaudia Jubilant
    Victor paternum dum repetit Polum?
    En qualis ardet, dum beati
    Limina scandit Ovans Olympi!
    XXI.
    Io Triumphe plectra Seraphica,
    Io Triumphe grex hominum sonet,
    Dum laeta quaquaversus ambos
    Astra repercutiunt Triumphos.
    [Page 106]

    Excitatio cordis Coelum versus.

    Ad seipsum.
    I.
    HEU quot sêcla teris carcere Corporis
    Wattsi, quid refugis Limen & Exitum?
    Nec meus Aethereum Culmen, & Atria
    Magni Patris anhelitat?
    II.
    Corpus vile creat mille Molestias,
    Circum Corda volant & Dolor, & Metus,
    Peccatumque malis durius omnibus
    Caecas Insidias struit.
    [Page 107]
    III.
    Non hoc grata tibi Gaudia de solo
    Surgunt. Christus abest, deliciae tuae,
    Longè Christus abest, Inter & Angelos
    Et picta astra perambulans.
    IV.
    * Vide Horat. Lib. 1. Od. 3.
    Coeli summa petas, nec Jaculabitur
    Iracunda Tonans fulmina: Te Deus
    Hortatur; Vacuum tende per Aëra
    Pennas nunc homini datas.
    [Page 108][Page 110]
  • THE HAZARD OF Loving the Creatures.
  • Christ's Amazing Love AND My Amazing Coldness.
  • Wishing him ever with me.
  • THE Absence of the Beloved.
  • Sick of Love. Solom. Song, i. 3.
  • Sitting in an Arbour.
  • BEWAILING My own Inconstancy.
  • Forsaken, yet Hoping.
  • The Law and Gospel.
  • THE Death of MOSES, Deut. xxxii. 49, 50. and xxxiv. 5, 6.
  • AD Dominum nostrum & Servatorem Jesum Christum. ODA.

    I.
    TE, Grande Numen, Corporis Incola,
    Te, magna magni Progenies Patris,
    Nomen verendum nostri Jesû
    Vox, Citharae, Calami sonabunt.
    II.
    Aptentur auro grandisonae Fides,
    Christi Triumphos incipe Barbite,
    Fractosque terrores Averni,
    Victum Erebum, domitamque Mortem.
    [Page 101]
    III.
    Immensa vastos saecula circulos
    Volvêre, blando dum Patris in sinû
    Toto fruebatur Jehovâ
    Gaudia mille bibens Jesus;
    IV.
    Donec superno vidit ab Aethere
    Adam cadentem, Tartara hiantia,
    Unâque mergendos ruinâ
    Heu nimium miseros Nepotes.
    V.
    Vidit minaces Vindicis Angeli
    Ignes & Ensem, Telaque Sanguine
    Tingenda nostro, dum rapinae
    Spe fremuere Erebaea Monstra.
    VI.
    Commota Sacras Viscera protinus
    Sensêre flammas, Omnipotens Furor
    Ebullit, Immensique Amoris
    Aethereum calet Igne pectus.
    [Page 102]
    VII.
    "Non tota prorsus Gens hominum dabit
    " Hosti triumphos: Quid Patris & Labor
    "Dulcisque Imago? Num peribunt
    " Funditus? O prius Astra caecis
    VIII.
    "Mergantur undis, & redeat Chaos.
    " Aut ipse disperdam Satanae dolos,
    "Aut ipse disperdar, & isti
    " Sceptra dabo moderanda dextrae.
    IX.
    "Testor paternum Numen, & hoc Caput
    " Aequale testor, dixit, & Aetheris
    Inclinat ingens culmen, alto
    Desiliitque ruens Olympo.
    X.
    Mortale corpus impiger induit
    Artusque nostros, heu tenues nimis
    Nimisque viles! Vindicique
    Corda dedit fodienda Ferro,
    [Page 103]
    XI.
    Vitamque Morti; Proh dolor! O graves
    Tonantis Irae! O Lex nimis aspera!
    Mercesque peccati severa
    Adamici, vetitique fructus
    XII.
    Non poena lenis! Quô ruis impotens!
    Quo Musa! largas fundere lachrymas,
    Bustique Divini triumphos
    Sacrilego temerare fletu?
    XIII.
    Sepone questus. Laeta Deum cane
    Majore Chordâ. Psalle sonoriùs
    Ut ferreas Mortis cavernas
    Et rigidam penetravit Aulam.
    XIV.
    Sensêre Numen Regna feralia,
    Mugit Barathrum, contremuit Chaos,
    Dirùm fremebat Rex Gehennae,
    Perque suum tremebundus Orcum
    [Page 104]
    XV.
    Latè refugit. "Nil agis Impie,
    " Mergat vel Imis te Phlegethon vadis,
    "Hoc findet undas fulmen, Inquit,
    Et patrios Jaculatus Ignes
    XVI.
    Trajecit hostem. Nigra Silentia
    Umbraeque flammas Aethereas pavent
    Dudum perosae, ex quo corusco
    Praecipites cecidere Coelo.
    XVII.
    Immane rugit jam Tonitru; fragor
    Latè ruinam mandat: ab infimis
    Lectaeque destinata genti
    Tartara disjiciuntur antris.
    XVIII.
    Heìc strata passim vincula, & heìc jacent
    Unci cruenti, Tormina Mentium
    Invisa, ploratuque vasto
    Spicula Mors sibi adempta plangit.
    [Page 105]
    XIX.
    En, ut resurgit Victor ab ultimo
    Ditis Profundo, curribus aureis
    Astricta raptans Monstra Noctis
    Perdomitumque Erebi Tyrannum.
    XX.
    Quanta Angelorum gaudia Jubilant
    Victor paternum dum repetit Polum?
    En qualis ardet, dum beati
    Limina scandit Ovans Olympi!
    XXI.
    Io Triumphe plectra Seraphica,
    Io Triumphe grex hominum sonet,
    Dum laeta quaquaversus ambos
    Astra repercutiunt Triumphos.
  • Excitatio cordis Coelum versus.

    Ad seipsum.
    I.
    HEU quot sêcla teris carcere Corporis
    Wattsi, quid refugis Limen & Exitum?
    Nec meus Aethereum Culmen, & Atria
    Magni Patris anhelitat?
    II.
    Corpus vile creat mille Molestias,
    Circum Corda volant & Dolor, & Metus,
    Peccatumque malis durius omnibus
    Caecas Insidias struit.
    [Page 107]
    III.
    Non hoc grata tibi Gaudia de solo
    Surgunt. Christus abest, deliciae tuae,
    Longè Christus abest, Inter & Angelos
    Et picta astra perambulans.
    IV.
    * Vide Horat. Lib. 1. Od. 3.
    Coeli summa petas, nec Jaculabitur
    Iracunda Tonans fulmina: Te Deus
    Hortatur; Vacuum tende per Aëra
    Pennas nunc homini datas.
  • Breathing towards the Heavenly Country. Casimire. Book I. Od. 19. Imitated. Urit me Patriae Decor, &c.
  • THE GLORIES of GOD Exceed all Worship.
  • The END of the First BOOK.
  • BOOK II.Odes, Elegies and Epistles, &c. SACRED TO VERTUE, LOYALTY AND FRIENDSHIP.

    [Page 117][Page 119][Page 121][Page 123][Page 128][Page 130][Page 133][Page 136][Page 141][Page 153][Page 155][Page 158][Page 164][Page 167][Page 169][Page 175][Page 180][Page 182][Page 189][Page 194][Page 203]

    EPISTOLA. Fratri suo dilecto R. W. J. W. S. P. D.

    RUrsum tuas, Amande Frater, Accepi Literas, eodem fortassè momento quo meae ad te pervenerunt; Idemque qui te scribentem vidit Dies, meum ad Epistolare munus excitavit Calamum; Non Inane est inter nos Fraternum nomen, unicus enim Spiritus nos intùs animat, agitque, & Concordes in ambobus efficit motus: O Utinam crescat indiès, & vigescat mutua Charitas; faxit Deus, ut amor sui nostra incendat & defoecet pectora, tunc etenim & alternis purae Amicitiae flammis erga nos invicèm Divinum in modum ardebimus; Contemplemur JESUM nostrum, Coeleste illud & adorandum Exemplar Charitatis. Ille est
    [Page 204]
    Qui quondam aeterno delapsus ab Aethere Vultus
    Induit Humanos, ut posset Corpore nostras
    Heu miseras sufferre vices; Sponsoris obivit
    Munia, & in sese Tabulae maledicta Minacis
    Transtulit, & sceleris poenas hominisque reatu•….
    Ecce jacet desertus humi, diffusus in herbam
    Integer, innocuas versus sua sidera Palmas
    Et placidum attollens Vultum, nec ad oscula Patris
    Amplexus solitosve: Artus nudatus amictu
    Sidereos, & sponte sinum patefactus ad Iras
    Numinis armati. "Pater, hic infige
    * Job 4. 6.
    Sagittas,
    "Haec, ait, iratum sorbebunt Pectora Ferrum,
    " Abluat Aethereus mortalia Crimina Sanguis.
    Dixit, & horrendùm fremuerunt maenia Coeli
    Infensusque Deus; (quem jam posuisse paternum
    Musa queri vellet nomen, sed & ipsa fragores
    Ad tantos pavefacta silet,) Jam dissilit Aether,
    Pandunturque fores, ubi duro Carcere regnat
    IRA, & Poenarum Thesauros mille coercet.
    [Page 205]
    Inde ruunt gravidi vesano Sulphure Nimbi,
    Centuplicisque volant contorta Volumina Flammae
    In Caput immeritum; diro hic sub Pondere pressus
    Restat, compressos dumque ardens explicat artus
    Luc. 22. 44.
    Purpureo Vestes tinctae sudore madescunt.
    Nec tamen infando Vindex Regina labori
    Segniùs incumbit, sed lassos increpat Ignes
    Acritèr, & somno languentem suscitat
    * Zec. 13. 7.
    Ensem:
    "Surge, age, Divinum pete Pectus, & imbue sacro
    " Flumine mucronem; Vos hinc, mea Spicula, latè
    "Ferrea per totum dispergite tormina Christum,
    " Immensum tolerare valet: Ad pondera Poenae
    "Sustentanda hominem suffulciet Incola Numen.
    " Et tu sacra Decas Legum, Violata Tabella,
    "Ebibe Vindictam; vastâ satiabere caede,
    " Mortalis Culpae pensabit dedecus ingens
    "Permistus Deitate Cruor —
    Sic fata, immiti contorquet Vulnera Dextrâ
    Dilaniatque Sinus, Sancti penetralia Cordis
    Panduntur, saevis avidus Dolor involat alis,
    [Page 206]
    Atque audax Mentem Scrutatur, & Ilia mordet.
    Interea Servator
    * 2 Col. 15.
    Ovat, Victorque Doloris
    Eminet, Illustri
    22 Luc. 44.
    perfusus membra Cruore,
    Exultatque Miser fieri; nam fortius illum
    Urget Patris honos, & non vincenda Voluptas
    Servandi miseros Sontes. O Nobilis Ardor
    Poenarum! O quid non Mortalia pectora cogis
    Durus amor? Quid non Coelestia? —

    At subsidat Phantasia, vanescant Imagines, Nescio quo me proripuit amens Musa; Volui quatuor lineas pedibus astringere, & Ecce! Numeri crescunt in immensum, dumque concitato Genio laxavi fraena, Vereor ne juvenilis Impetus Theologiam laeserit, & audax nimis Imaginatio. Heri ad me allata est Epistola indicans Matrem meliusculè se habere, licet Ignis febrilis non prorsus deseruit mortale ejus Domicilium. Plura volui, sed turgidi & crescentes versus noluêre plura, & coarctârunt Scriptionis limites. Vale, Amice Frater, & in stadio pietatis & artis Medicae strenuus decurre. Datum a Musaeo meo Londini, xv. Kalend. Febr. Anno salutis MDCXCIII.

    [Page 207]

    Ad Reverendum Virum Dom. Johannem Pinhorne, Fidum pueritiae meae Praeceptorem. Pindarici Carminis Specimen.

    I.
    ET te, PINORNI, Musa Trisantica
    Salutat, ardens discipulam tuam
    Graté fateri: Nunc Athenas,
    Nunc Latias per amaenitates
    Tutò pererrans te recolit Ducem,
    Te quondam teneros & Ebraia per aspera gressus
    Duxisse fidâ manu.
    [Page 210]
    Tuo patescunt lumine Thespii
    Campi atque ad arcem Pierid••…iter.
    En altus assurgens Homerus
    Arma Deosque Virosque miscens
    Occupat Aethereum Parnassi culmen: Homeri
    Immensos stupeo Manes —
    Te, Maro dulcé canens sylvas, te bella sonantem
    Ardua, da veniam tenui venerare Camoenâ;
    Tuaeque accipias, Thebane Vates,
    Debita Thura Lyrae.
    Vobis, magna Trias! clarissima Nomina, semper
    Scrinia nostra patent, & Pectora nostra patebunt,
    Quum mihi cunque levem concesserit otia & horam
    Divina Mosis pagina.
    II.
    Flaccus ad hanc Triadem ponatur, at ipse pudendas
    Deponat Veneres: Venias, sed
    * Horat. Lib. 1. Sat. 6.
    purus & Insons
    Ut te collaudem, dum sordes & mala lustra
    Ablutus, Venusine, canis ridesve. Recisae
    Hâc lege accedant Satyrae Juvenalis, amari
    Terrores vitiorum. At longè caecus abesset
    [Page 211]
    Persius, obscurus Vates, nisi lumina circumscidisses.
    Fusa forent, Sphingisque aenigmata, Bonde,
    Grande sonans Senecae Fulmen, grandisque Cothurni
    Pompa Sophoclei celso ponantur eodem
    Ordine, & ambâbus simul hos amplectar in ulnis.
    Tutò, Poetae, tutò habitabitis
    Pictos abacos: Improba Tinea
    Obiit, nec audet saeva castas
    Attingere Blatta Camaenas.
    At tu renidens foeda Epigrammatum
    Farrago inertûm, stercoris impii
    Sentina soetens, Martialis,
    In Barathrum relegandus imum
    Aufuge, & hinc tecum rapias Catullum
    Insulsè mollem, naribus, auribus
    Ingrata castis carmina, & improbi
    Spurcos Nasonis Amores.
    III.
    Nobilis extremâ gradiens Caledonis ab orâ
    En Buchananus adest. Divini Psaltis Imago
    Jessiadae Salveto; potens seu Numinis Iras
    Fulminibus miscere, sacro vel lumine Mentis
    [Page 212]
    Fugare noctes, vel Citharae sono
    Sedare fluctus Pectoris.
    Tu mihi haerebis comes ambulanti,
    Tu domi astabis socius perennis,
    Nunc Mensae tenui simul assidere
    Dignabere, nunc Lecticae.
    Mox recumbentis vigilans ad aurem
    Aureos suadebis inire Somnos
    Sacra sopitis superinferens oblivia curis.
    Stet juxtà
    * M. Casimirus Sarbiewski Poeta insign is Polonus.
    Casimirus, huic nec parciùs Ignem
    Natura indulsit, nec Musa armavit Alumnum
    * M. Casimirus Sarbiewski Poeta insign is Polonus.
    Sarbivium rudiore Lyrâ.
    Quanta Polonum levat aura Cygnum!
    Od. 5. Lib. 2.
    Humana linquens (en sibi devii
    Montes recedunt) luxuriantibus
    Spatiatur in aëre pennis.
    Seu tu fortè Virum tollis ad aethera,
    Cognatosve Thronos & patrium Polum
    Visurus consurgis ovans,
    [Page 213]
    Visum fatigas, aciemque fallis,
    Dum tuum à longè stupeo volatum
    O non Imitabilis Ales.
    IV.
    Sarbivii ad nomen gelida incalet
    Musa, simul totus fervescere
    Sentio, Stellatas levis induor
    Alas & tollor in altum.
    Jam juga Zionis radens pede
    Elato inter sidera vertice
    Longè despecto mortalia.
    Quam juvat altisonis volitare per aethera pennis,
    Et ridere procul fallacia Gaudia sêcli
    Terrellae Grandia inania,
    Quae mortale genus (heu malè) deperit.
    O Curas hominum miseras, Cano,
    Et miseras nugas Diademata,
    Ventosae sortis Ludibrium!
    En mihi subsidunt Terrenae à pectore Faeces,
    Gestit & effraenis divinum effundere Carme
    Mens afflata Deo —
    — At vos Heroes & Arma
    [Page 214]
    Et procul este Dii, Ludicra Numina.
    Quid mihi cum vestrae pondere Lanceae,
    Pallas! aut vestris, Dionyse, Thyrsis?
    Et Clava, & Anguis, & Leo, & Hercules,
    Et brutum Tonitru fictitii Patris
    Abstate à carmine nostro.
    V.
    Te, Deus Omnipotens! Te nostra sonabit Jesu
    Musa, nec assueto coelestes Barbiton ausû
    Tentabit numeros. Vasti sine limite Numen; &
    Immensum sine lege Deum numeri sine lege sonabunt.

    Sed Musam magna pollicentem destituit vigor, Divino jubare perstringitur oculorum acies: En labascit pennis, tremit artubus, ruit deorsum per inane Aetheris, jacet victa, obstupescit, silet.

    Ignoscas Reverende Vir vano conamini, fragmen hoc rude licèt & impolitum aequi boni Consulas, & gratitudinis jam diu debitae in partem reponas.

    [Page 215]

    VOTUM. SEU Vita in terris beata. AD Virum Dignissimum Johannem Hartoppium Baronettum. 1702.

    I.
    HARTOPPI, longo stemmate nobilis
    Venâque Ingenii divite, si roges
    Quem mea Musa beat,
    Ille mihi Felix ter & ampliùs,
    Et similes superis annos agit
    Qui sibi sufficiens semper adest sibi.
    Hunc longè à curis mortalibus
    Inter agros, sylvasque silentes
    [Page 216]
    Se Musisque suis tranquillâ in pace fruentem
    Sol oriens videt & recumbens.
    II.
    Non suae Vulgi favor insolentis
    (Plausus insani vacuus popelli)
    Mentis ad sacram penetrabit arcem
    Feriat licèt aethera clamor.
    Nec Gaza flammans divitis Indiae,
    Nec, Tage, vestrae fulgor Arenulae
    Ducent ab obscurâ quiete
    Ad laquear radiantis Aulae.
    III.
    O si daretur stamina proprii
    Tractare fusi pollice proprio,
    Atque meum mihi fingere Fatum;
    Candidus vitae color innocentis
    Fila nativo decoraret Albo
    Non Tyriâ; vitiata conchâ.
    Non aurum, non gemma nitens, nec purpura telae
    Intertexta forent invidiosa meae.
    Longé à Triumphis, & sonitu Tubae
    Longé remotos transigerem dies,
    [Page 217]
    Abstate Fasces, splendida Vanitas,
    Et vos abstate, Coronae.
    IV.
    Pro meo tecto casa sit, salubres
    Captet Auroras, procul Urbis atro
    Distet à fumo, fugiatque longé
    Dura Pthisis mala, dura Tussis.
    Displicet Byrsa, & fremitu molesto
    Turba Mercantûm; gratiùs alvear
    Demulcet aures murmure, gratius
    Fons salientis aquae.
    V.
    Litigiosa Fori me terrent jurgia, lenes
    Ad Sylvas properans rixosas execror artes
    Eminus in tuto à Linguis —
    Blandimenta artis simul aequus odi,
    Valete, Cives! & amaena Fraudis
    Verba; proh Mores! & inane Sacri
    Nomen Amici!
    VI.
    Tuque, quae nostris inimica Musis
    Felle sacratum vitias amorem,
    [Page 218]
    Absis aeternùm, Diva libidinis,
    Et Pharetrate Puer!
    Hinc hinc, Cupido, longius avola,
    Nil mihi cum foedis, Puer, ignibus,
    Aethereâ fervent face pectora,
    Sacra mihi Venus est Urania,
    Et juvenis Jessaeus Amor mihi.
    VII.
    Coeleste carmen (nec taceat lyra
    Jessaea) laetis auribus insonet,
    Nec Watsianis è medullis
    Ulla dies rapiet vel hora.
    Sacri Libelli deliciae meae,
    Et vos, Sodales, semper amabiles,
    Nunc simul adsitis, nunc vicissim,
    Et fallite taedia vitae.
    [Page 219][Page 246][Page 264]
  • TO Her MAJESTY.
  • TO Mr. John Lock Retired from The World of Business.
  • TO Mr. JOHN SHUTE ON Mr. LOCK's Dangerous Sickness sometime after he had retired to study the Scriptures.
  • FRIENDSHIP.
  • TO Nathanael Gould Esq
  • TO Dr. Thomas Gibson.
  • TO My Brothers E. and T. W.
  • TO Mr. A. S. and Mr. T. H.
  • ON The Sudden Death OF Mrs. Mary Peacock.
  • TO THE Reverend Mr. B. Rowe.
  • TO My Sisters S. and M. W.
  • TO Mr. C. and S. Fleetwood.
  • TO Mr. William Blackbourn.
  • TO Mr. Robert Atwood.
  • Free Philosophy.
  • To the Reverend Mr. John Howe.
  • TO Mr. Nicholas Clark.
  • UPON The Dismal Narrative OF THE Afflictions of a Friend.
  • THE REVERSE; ON THE View of some of my Friends remaining Comforts.
  • To the Right Honourable JOHN Lord CUTTS. [At the Siege of Namure.]
  • Against Tears. The beginning of Ode 23. Book 4. of Casimire Imitated. Si, quae flent mala, lugubres Auferrent Oculi, &c.
  • A Word of Warning, OR Few Happy Marriages.
  • TO Mr. Henry Bendish.
  • TO David Polhill Esq
  • TO David Polhill Esq
  • TO THE Discontented and Unquiet.
  • TO John Hartopp Esq
  • TO Thomas Gunston Esq
  • TO John Hartopp Esq
  • EPISTOLA. Fratri suo dilecto R. W. J. W. S. P. D.

    RUrsum tuas, Amande Frater, Accepi Literas, eodem fortassè momento quo meae ad te pervenerunt; Idemque qui te scribentem vidit Dies, meum ad Epistolare munus excitavit Calamum; Non Inane est inter nos Fraternum nomen, unicus enim Spiritus nos intùs animat, agitque, & Concordes in ambobus efficit motus: O Utinam crescat indiès, & vigescat mutua Charitas; faxit Deus, ut amor sui nostra incendat & defoecet pectora, tunc etenim & alternis purae Amicitiae flammis erga nos invicèm Divinum in modum ardebimus; Contemplemur JESUM nostrum, Coeleste illud & adorandum Exemplar Charitatis. Ille est
    [Page 204]
    Qui quondam aeterno delapsus ab Aethere Vultus
    Induit Humanos, ut posset Corpore nostras
    Heu miseras sufferre vices; Sponsoris obivit
    Munia, & in sese Tabulae maledicta Minacis
    Transtulit, & sceleris poenas hominisque reatu•….
    Ecce jacet desertus humi, diffusus in herbam
    Integer, innocuas versus sua sidera Palmas
    Et placidum attollens Vultum, nec ad oscula Patris
    Amplexus solitosve: Artus nudatus amictu
    Sidereos, & sponte sinum patefactus ad Iras
    Numinis armati. "Pater, hic infige
    * Job 4. 6.
    Sagittas,
    "Haec, ait, iratum sorbebunt Pectora Ferrum,
    " Abluat Aethereus mortalia Crimina Sanguis.
    Dixit, & horrendùm fremuerunt maenia Coeli
    Infensusque Deus; (quem jam posuisse paternum
    Musa queri vellet nomen, sed & ipsa fragores
    Ad tantos pavefacta silet,) Jam dissilit Aether,
    Pandunturque fores, ubi duro Carcere regnat
    IRA, & Poenarum Thesauros mille coercet.
    [Page 205]
    Inde ruunt gravidi vesano Sulphure Nimbi,
    Centuplicisque volant contorta Volumina Flammae
    In Caput immeritum; diro hic sub Pondere pressus
    Restat, compressos dumque ardens explicat artus
    Luc. 22. 44.
    Purpureo Vestes tinctae sudore madescunt.
    Nec tamen infando Vindex Regina labori
    Segniùs incumbit, sed lassos increpat Ignes
    Acritèr, & somno languentem suscitat
    * Zec. 13. 7.
    Ensem:
    "Surge, age, Divinum pete Pectus, & imbue sacro
    " Flumine mucronem; Vos hinc, mea Spicula, latè
    "Ferrea per totum dispergite tormina Christum,
    " Immensum tolerare valet: Ad pondera Poenae
    "Sustentanda hominem suffulciet Incola Numen.
    " Et tu sacra Decas Legum, Violata Tabella,
    "Ebibe Vindictam; vastâ satiabere caede,
    " Mortalis Culpae pensabit dedecus ingens
    "Permistus Deitate Cruor —
    Sic fata, immiti contorquet Vulnera Dextrâ
    Dilaniatque Sinus, Sancti penetralia Cordis
    Panduntur, saevis avidus Dolor involat alis,
    [Page 206]
    Atque audax Mentem Scrutatur, & Ilia mordet.
    Interea Servator
    * 2 Col. 15.
    Ovat, Victorque Doloris
    Eminet, Illustri
    22 Luc. 44.
    perfusus membra Cruore,
    Exultatque Miser fieri; nam fortius illum
    Urget Patris honos, & non vincenda Voluptas
    Servandi miseros Sontes. O Nobilis Ardor
    Poenarum! O quid non Mortalia pectora cogis
    Durus amor? Quid non Coelestia? —

    At subsidat Phantasia, vanescant Imagines, Nescio quo me proripuit amens Musa; Volui quatuor lineas pedibus astringere, & Ecce! Numeri crescunt in immensum, dumque concitato Genio laxavi fraena, Vereor ne juvenilis Impetus Theologiam laeserit, & audax nimis Imaginatio. Heri ad me allata est Epistola indicans Matrem meliusculè se habere, licet Ignis febrilis non prorsus deseruit mortale ejus Domicilium. Plura volui, sed turgidi & crescentes versus noluêre plura, & coarctârunt Scriptionis limites. Vale, Amice Frater, & in stadio pietatis & artis Medicae strenuus decurre. Datum a Musaeo meo Londini, xv. Kalend. Febr. Anno salutis MDCXCIII.

  • TO Dr. JOHN SPEED of Southampton.
  • Ad Reverendum Virum Dom. Johannem Pinhorne, Fidum pueritiae meae Praeceptorem. Pindarici Carminis Specimen.

    I.
    ET te, PINORNI, Musa Trisantica
    Salutat, ardens discipulam tuam
    Graté fateri: Nunc Athenas,
    Nunc Latias per amaenitates
    Tutò pererrans te recolit Ducem,
    Te quondam teneros & Ebraia per aspera gressus
    Duxisse fidâ manu.
    [Page 210]
    Tuo patescunt lumine Thespii
    Campi atque ad arcem Pierid••…iter.
    En altus assurgens Homerus
    Arma Deosque Virosque miscens
    Occupat Aethereum Parnassi culmen: Homeri
    Immensos stupeo Manes —
    Te, Maro dulcé canens sylvas, te bella sonantem
    Ardua, da veniam tenui venerare Camoenâ;
    Tuaeque accipias, Thebane Vates,
    Debita Thura Lyrae.
    Vobis, magna Trias! clarissima Nomina, semper
    Scrinia nostra patent, & Pectora nostra patebunt,
    Quum mihi cunque levem concesserit otia & horam
    Divina Mosis pagina.
    II.
    Flaccus ad hanc Triadem ponatur, at ipse pudendas
    Deponat Veneres: Venias, sed
    * Horat. Lib. 1. Sat. 6.
    purus & Insons
    Ut te collaudem, dum sordes & mala lustra
    Ablutus, Venusine, canis ridesve. Recisae
    Hâc lege accedant Satyrae Juvenalis, amari
    Terrores vitiorum. At longè caecus abesset
    [Page 211]
    Persius, obscurus Vates, nisi lumina circumscidisses.
    Fusa forent, Sphingisque aenigmata, Bonde,
    Grande sonans Senecae Fulmen, grandisque Cothurni
    Pompa Sophoclei celso ponantur eodem
    Ordine, & ambâbus simul hos amplectar in ulnis.
    Tutò, Poetae, tutò habitabitis
    Pictos abacos: Improba Tinea
    Obiit, nec audet saeva castas
    Attingere Blatta Camaenas.
    At tu renidens foeda Epigrammatum
    Farrago inertûm, stercoris impii
    Sentina soetens, Martialis,
    In Barathrum relegandus imum
    Aufuge, & hinc tecum rapias Catullum
    Insulsè mollem, naribus, auribus
    Ingrata castis carmina, & improbi
    Spurcos Nasonis Amores.
    III.
    Nobilis extremâ gradiens Caledonis ab orâ
    En Buchananus adest. Divini Psaltis Imago
    Jessiadae Salveto; potens seu Numinis Iras
    Fulminibus miscere, sacro vel lumine Mentis
    [Page 212]
    Fugare noctes, vel Citharae sono
    Sedare fluctus Pectoris.
    Tu mihi haerebis comes ambulanti,
    Tu domi astabis socius perennis,
    Nunc Mensae tenui simul assidere
    Dignabere, nunc Lecticae.
    Mox recumbentis vigilans ad aurem
    Aureos suadebis inire Somnos
    Sacra sopitis superinferens oblivia curis.
    Stet juxtà
    * M. Casimirus Sarbiewski Poeta insign is Polonus.
    Casimirus, huic nec parciùs Ignem
    Natura indulsit, nec Musa armavit Alumnum
    * M. Casimirus Sarbiewski Poeta insign is Polonus.
    Sarbivium rudiore Lyrâ.
    Quanta Polonum levat aura Cygnum!
    Od. 5. Lib. 2.
    Humana linquens (en sibi devii
    Montes recedunt) luxuriantibus
    Spatiatur in aëre pennis.
    Seu tu fortè Virum tollis ad aethera,
    Cognatosve Thronos & patrium Polum
    Visurus consurgis ovans,
    [Page 213]
    Visum fatigas, aciemque fallis,
    Dum tuum à longè stupeo volatum
    O non Imitabilis Ales.
    IV.
    Sarbivii ad nomen gelida incalet
    Musa, simul totus fervescere
    Sentio, Stellatas levis induor
    Alas & tollor in altum.
    Jam juga Zionis radens pede
    Elato inter sidera vertice
    Longè despecto mortalia.
    Quam juvat altisonis volitare per aethera pennis,
    Et ridere procul fallacia Gaudia sêcli
    Terrellae Grandia inania,
    Quae mortale genus (heu malè) deperit.
    O Curas hominum miseras, Cano,
    Et miseras nugas Diademata,
    Ventosae sortis Ludibrium!
    En mihi subsidunt Terrenae à pectore Faeces,
    Gestit & effraenis divinum effundere Carme
    Mens afflata Deo —
    — At vos Heroes & Arma
    [Page 214]
    Et procul este Dii, Ludicra Numina.
    Quid mihi cum vestrae pondere Lanceae,
    Pallas! aut vestris, Dionyse, Thyrsis?
    Et Clava, & Anguis, & Leo, & Hercules,
    Et brutum Tonitru fictitii Patris
    Abstate à carmine nostro.
    V.
    Te, Deus Omnipotens! Te nostra sonabit Jesu
    Musa, nec assueto coelestes Barbiton ausû
    Tentabit numeros. Vasti sine limite Numen; &
    Immensum sine lege Deum numeri sine lege sonabunt.

    Sed Musam magna pollicentem destituit vigor, Divino jubare perstringitur oculorum acies: En labascit pennis, tremit artubus, ruit deorsum per inane Aetheris, jacet victa, obstupescit, silet.

    Ignoscas Reverende Vir vano conamini, fragmen hoc rude licèt & impolitum aequi boni Consulas, & gratitudinis jam diu debitae in partem reponas.

  • VOTUM. SEU Vita in terris beata. AD Virum Dignissimum Johannem Hartoppium Baronettum. 1702.

    I.
    HARTOPPI, longo stemmate nobilis
    Venâque Ingenii divite, si roges
    Quem mea Musa beat,
    Ille mihi Felix ter & ampliùs,
    Et similes superis annos agit
    Qui sibi sufficiens semper adest sibi.
    Hunc longè à curis mortalibus
    Inter agros, sylvasque silentes
    [Page 216]
    Se Musisque suis tranquillâ in pace fruentem
    Sol oriens videt & recumbens.
    II.
    Non suae Vulgi favor insolentis
    (Plausus insani vacuus popelli)
    Mentis ad sacram penetrabit arcem
    Feriat licèt aethera clamor.
    Nec Gaza flammans divitis Indiae,
    Nec, Tage, vestrae fulgor Arenulae
    Ducent ab obscurâ quiete
    Ad laquear radiantis Aulae.
    III.
    O si daretur stamina proprii
    Tractare fusi pollice proprio,
    Atque meum mihi fingere Fatum;
    Candidus vitae color innocentis
    Fila nativo decoraret Albo
    Non Tyriâ; vitiata conchâ.
    Non aurum, non gemma nitens, nec purpura telae
    Intertexta forent invidiosa meae.
    Longé à Triumphis, & sonitu Tubae
    Longé remotos transigerem dies,
    [Page 217]
    Abstate Fasces, splendida Vanitas,
    Et vos abstate, Coronae.
    IV.
    Pro meo tecto casa sit, salubres
    Captet Auroras, procul Urbis atro
    Distet à fumo, fugiatque longé
    Dura Pthisis mala, dura Tussis.
    Displicet Byrsa, & fremitu molesto
    Turba Mercantûm; gratiùs alvear
    Demulcet aures murmure, gratius
    Fons salientis aquae.
    V.
    Litigiosa Fori me terrent jurgia, lenes
    Ad Sylvas properans rixosas execror artes
    Eminus in tuto à Linguis —
    Blandimenta artis simul aequus odi,
    Valete, Cives! & amaena Fraudis
    Verba; proh Mores! & inane Sacri
    Nomen Amici!
    VI.
    Tuque, quae nostris inimica Musis
    Felle sacratum vitias amorem,
    [Page 218]
    Absis aeternùm, Diva libidinis,
    Et Pharetrate Puer!
    Hinc hinc, Cupido, longius avola,
    Nil mihi cum foedis, Puer, ignibus,
    Aethereâ fervent face pectora,
    Sacra mihi Venus est Urania,
    Et juvenis Jessaeus Amor mihi.
    VII.
    Coeleste carmen (nec taceat lyra
    Jessaea) laetis auribus insonet,
    Nec Watsianis è medullis
    Ulla dies rapiet vel hora.
    Sacri Libelli deliciae meae,
    Et vos, Sodales, semper amabiles,
    Nunc simul adsitis, nunc vicissim,
    Et fallite taedia vitae.
  • A Funeral POEM ON Thomas Gunston Esq
  • AN ELEGY ON THE Reverend Mr. Tho. Gouge.
  • AN EPITAPH ON King WILLIAM III. Of Glorious Memory, Who Died March 8th. 1701.
  • FINIS.
  • BOOKS Printed for John Lawrence at the Angel in the Poultrey.

    VIndiciae Mentis. An Essay of the Being and Nature of the Mind: Wherein the Dostinction of Mind and Body, the Substantiality, Personality, and Perfection of Mind is asserted; and the Original of our Minds, their Present, Separate, and Future state, is freely inquired into, in order to a more certain Foundation for the Knowledge of God and our Selves, and the Clearing all Doubts and Objections that have been, or may be made concerning the LIFE and IMMORTALITY of our SOULS. In a new Method. By a Gentleman. 8vo.

    New Essays on Trade, wherein the present State of our Trade, its Great Decay in the Chief Branches of it, and the Fatal Consequence thereof to the Nation (unless timely remedy'd) is Consider'd, under the most Important Heads of Trade and Navigation. By Francis Brewster Kt. In 8vo.

    Exercitations, Critical, Philosophical, Historical, and Theological. On several important Pieces in the Writings of the Old and New Testament. By John Edwards D. D. 8vo.

    Theo-Politica: Or a Body of Divinity, containing the Rules of the Special Government of GOD, according to which he orders the Immortal and Intellectual Creatures, Angels, and Man, to their Final and Eternal State. Being a Method of those Laving Truths, which are contain'd in the Canon of the Holy Scripture, or abridg'd in those Words of our Saviour Jesus Christ [Go and teach all Nations, &c.] which were the Ground and Foundation of those Apostolical Creeds and Forms of Confessions, related by the Ancients; and in particular by Irenaeus and Tertullian. By that Learned Divine George Lawson late Rector of More in the County of Salop. 8vo.