[Page 19]

[FRAGMENT] IV.

CONNAL, CRIMORA,
CRIMORA.

WHO cometh from the hill, like a cloud tinged with the beam of the west? Whose voice is that, loud as the wind, but pleasant as the harp of Carryl? It is my love in the light of steel; but sad is his darkened brow. Live the mighty race of Fingal? or what disturbs my Connal?

CONNAL.

THEY live. I saw them return from the chace, like a stream of light. The fun was on their shields: In a line they descended the hill. Loud is the voice of[Page] the youth; the war, my love, is near. To-morrow the enormous Dargo comes to try the force of our race. The race of Fingal he defies; the race of battle and wounds.

CRIMORA.

CONNAL, I saw his sails like grey mist on the sable wave. They came to land. Connal, many are the warriors of Dargo!

CONNAL.

BRING me thy father's shield; the iron shield of Rinval; that shield like the full moon when it is darkened in the sky.

[Page]
CRIMORA.

THAT shield I bring, O Connal; but it did not defend my father. By the spear of Gauror he fell. Thou mayst fall, O Connal!

CONNAL.

FALL indeed I may: But raise my tomb, Crimora. Some stones, a mound of earth, shall keep my memory. Though fair thou art, my love, as the light; more pleasant than the gale of the hill; yet I will not stay. Raise my tomb, Crimora.

CRIMORA.

THEN give me those arms of light; that sword, and that spear of steel. I shall meet Dargo with thee, and aid my[Page 22] lovely Connal. Farewell, ye rocks of Ardven! ye deer! and ye streams of the hill! We shall return no more. Our tombs are distant far.

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    About this text

    Title (in Source Edition): [FRAGMENT] IV.
    Themes:
    Genres: prose poem; imitation; translation; paraphrase; fragment

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    Fragments of ancient poetry, collected in the Highlands of Scotland, and translated from the Galic or Erse language. Edinburgh: printed for G. Hamilton and J. Balfour, 1760, pp. 19-22. 70p.; 8⁰. (ESTC T83707; OTA K068251.000) (Page images digitized by National Library of Scotland — licensed under a CC Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 UK: Scotland license.)

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    The text has been typographically modernized, but without any silent modernization of spelling, capitalization, or punctuation. The source of the text is given and all editorial interventions have been recorded in textual notes. Based on the electronic text originally produced by the ECCO-TCP project, this ECPA text has been edited to conform to the recommendations found in Level 5 of the Best Practices for TEI in Libraries version 3.0.