An elegy on the death of Miss M----s. Eldest daughter of D---- M----, Esq. of the F---- H----, C----, Berkshire. Who died the 8th of July, 1785. By a gentleman of the Inner Temple. London: printed for H. D. Symonds, 1786. 22p.; 4⁰. (ESTC T32526; OTA K035592.000)

  • [Illustration]
  • AN ELEGY ON THE DEATH of MISS M—s.

    ELDEST DAUGHTER OF D— M—, ESQ. OF THE F— H—, C—, BERKSHIRE.

    WHO DIED THE 8th OF JULY, 1785.

    BY A GENTLEMAN OF THE INNER TEMPLE.

    IF purest virtue, sense refin'd in youth,
    Religious wisdom, and a love of truth,
    A mind that knew no thought ignobly mean,
    A temper sweetly chearful, yet serene,
    A breast that glow'd with those immortal fires
    Which Godlike charity alone inspires:
    If these could lengthen sate's tremendous doom
    And snatch one moment from the gaping tomb,
    Death had relenting thrown his dart aside,
    And HARRIOT, O my HARRIOT, had not died.
    EARL of ORRERY.
    "WATCH, O WATCH O'ER HER DUST, YE GENTLE POWERS
    " WHO KINDLY CALM THE SAINT'S DEPARTING HOURS. "
    MARIA; or, THE GENEROUS RUSTIC.

    LONDON: PRINTED FOR H. D. SYMONDS, STATIONER'S COURT, LUDGATE-STREET. MDCCLXXXVI.

  • TO THE SURVIVING MEMBERS OF THAT TRULY AMIABLE FAMILY OF WHICH MISS M—s WAS ONCE A BRIGHT, A DISTINGUISHED, AND A JUSTLY VALUED ORNAMENT, ARE THE FOLLOWING LINES INSCRIBED, BY THEIR SYMPATHIZING FRIEND, THE AUTHOR

  • ADVERTISEMENT.

    THESE lines are sacred to the memory of ONE who, not satisfied with the at tainment of every female excellence, and every human virtue, soared, on adventurous wing, into the regions of science and philosophy. She successfully rivalled those who have long been accustomed to behold with indifference, if not[Page viii] with contempt, the efforts of feminine genius, when either classical learning or philosophical disquisition have been the objects of pursuit.

    ALIKE distinguished by elegance of manners, by brilliancy of imagination, and soundness of judgment, it is almost needless to observe that, whilst living, she commanded the esteem and admiration of all who were so fortunate as to rank in the number of her friends, and who now join in sincerely regretting that Heaven, has for ever veiled from their eyes, ONE whose[Page ix] beauty, wit, and virtue, adorned a sex that has seldom, if ever produced her superior.

    IT is with just diffidence that these lines are now submitted to the public inspection. The Author had withheld them from the press in expectation that some abler bard would tune the lyre to the memory of his lamented friend. Encouraged however by the reception of a former work, he once more ventures himself as a candidate for public approbation; convinced that if it be merited, it will not be withheld.

    [Page x]

    IN the Elegy he has expressed his hopes that the poetical powers of Mr. Graves* The ingenious author of Euphrosyne, &c. &c., the elegant panegyrist of Miss M—>s in her infancy, will once more be exerted in paying a worthy tribute to her memory. Should the perusal of these lines suggest to that accomplished scholar, the idea of favouring the world with a fresh specimen of his poetical talents, the Author will have the satisfaction of knowing that, however little his own performance may have merited the indulgence of the public, it will have given birth to one,[Page xi] that will challenge universal applause, and perpe tuate the virtues of his amiable and accom plished friend — to whom, alas! he now bids a reluctant adieu in the words of Milton:

    "Since to part,
    "Go heavenly guest, aetherial messenger,
    "Sent from whose sovran goodness I adore.
    "Gentle to me and affable hath been
    "Thy condescension, and shall be honoured ever
    "With grateful memory. "
    PAR. LOST, Book viii.
  • AN ELEGY ON THE DEATH of MISS M—s.
  • FINIS.