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SONNET [59] LIX. Written during a Thunder Storm, September, 1791; in which the Moon was perfectly clear, while the Tempest gathered in various directions near the Earth.

1 WHAT awful pageants croud the evening sky!
2 The low horizon gath'ring vapours shroud,
3 Sudden, from many a deep embattled cloud,
4 Terrific thunders burst and light'nings fly
5 While in serenest azure, beaming high,
6 Night's regent of her calm pavilion proud,
7 Gilds the dark shadows that beneath her lie,
8 Unvex'd by all their conflicts fierce and loud
9 So, in unsullied dignity elate,
10 A spirit conscious of superior worth,
11 In placid elevation firmly great,
12 Scorns the vain cares that give Contention birth;
13 And blest with peace above the shocks of Fate,
14 Smiles at the tumult of the troubled earth.

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Title (in Source Edition): SONNET [59] LIX. Written during a Thunder Storm, September, 1791; in which the Moon was perfectly clear, while the Tempest gathered in various directions near the Earth.
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Genres: sonnet

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Source edition

Elegiac sonnets, and other poems. By Charlotte Smith. The first Worcester edition, from the sixth London edition, with additions. Printed at Worcester [Mass.]: by Isaiah Thomas, sold by him in Worcester, and by said Thomas and Andrews in Boston, 1795, p. 79. xix,[2],22-126,[2]p.,[5] leaves of plates: ill.; 15 cm. (12mo) (OTA N22357)

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The text has been typographically modernized, but without any silent modernization of spelling, capitalization, or punctuation. The source of the text is given and all editorial interventions have been recorded in textual notes. Based on the electronic text originally produced by the ECCO-TCP project, this ECPA text has been edited to conform to the recommendations found in Level 5 of the Best Practices for TEI in Libraries version 3.0.

Other works by Charlotte Smith (née Turner)